Category: News

01 Apr

Backyard Farms for Mainebiz

djclough / Architectural, News / / 0 Comments

I recently had the pleasure of photographing Backyard Farms in Madison, Maine for Mainebiz. I was asked to get some shots in the greenhouse…little did I know that the greenhouse would turn out to be the largest building in the state of Maine – forty-two acres under a glass roof!

A fantastic operation producing, as the name implies, tomatoes just as good as the ones in your backyard in August, but available in supermarkets year round. In answer to the question on many people’s minds of how many tomatoes can be grown in a forty-two acre facility….90 million…and every one of them delicious.

Seen in the gallery are Stuart Jablon, president and COO, Tony Stevens, head grower, and employee Kelsey Brown.

I recently had the pleasure of photographing Backyard Farms in Madison, Maine for Mainebiz. I was asked to get some shots in the greenhouse…little did I know that the greenhouse would turn out to be the largest building in the state of Maine – forty-two acres under a glass roof!

A fantastic operation producing, as the name implies, tomatoes just as good as the ones in your backyard in August, but available in supermarkets year round. In answer to the question on many people’s minds of how many tomatoes can be grown in a forty-two acre facility….90 million…and every one of them delicious.

Seen in the gallery are Stuart Jablon, president and COO, Tony Stevens, head grower, and employee Kelsey Brown.

 

 

31 Aug

West of Japan / East of Europe

djclough / News / / 0 Comments

Rockland Photographer Dave Clough to Exhibit in Venice 

Collaboration with Italian architect will focus on Japanese design

 

 ROCKLAND, Maine — Rockland-based architectural photographer Dave Clough will display his work in Venice this fall at an exhibit about renowned German architect Bruno Taut’s Kyu Hyuga Bettei, a villa in Atami, Japan.

 

 Clough’s images will be shown alongside new, complete drawings of Taut’s design for the villa by Italian architect Marco Capitanio. The show, titled West of Japan / East of Europe, will run from September 9 to 22 in the Gino Valle exhibition space at University of Venice (IUAV), coinciding with the city’s 2016 Architecture Biennale. 

 

 The exhibit, curated by Capitanio, is devoted to the only existing project that Bruno Taut realized during his three-year stay in Japan in the 1930s. The villa embodies Taut’s deeply personal reflection on Japanese architecture, mediated through his European sensibility. By juxtaposing drawings and pictures, the exhibition will help visitors distinguish between the project’s form and proportion and its materials, textures and colors.

 

 The Taut exhibition is being organized by co+labo Radović at Keio University and the Formwork cultural association. Professor Darko Radović and professor Marko Pogacnik from the Formwork / IUAV have been instrumental in mounting the exhibition.

 

 As the exhibit opens, Clough will be one of the presenters at an international symposium about Kyu Hyuga Bettei and other projects that relate to designing for and within a foreign culture. The symposium will include a video interview with Japanese architect Kengo Kuma, who credits Bruno Taut as a major inspiration and influence in his work. 

 

Capitanio, a PhD candidate at Keio University in Tokyo, and Clough, who lived in Japan for 10 years, share a fascination with the country and its traditional architecture. But they only connected with each other recently.

 

 In 2010, Clough visited the Former Kusuo Yasuda Residence and got permission from the Japan National Trust to photograph it. Clough consequently got permission from the City of Atami to photograph the Kyu Hyuga Bettei in 2011. Capitanio came across the photos on Clough’s blog a few months ago and invited him to participate in the exhibition.

 “When I stepped into the Kyu Hyuga Bettei for the first time I felt instantly transported to another place and time,” Clough said. “I was first struck, as I always am in historic Japanese structures, by the woodwork — a well-worn bridge to the past. I felt in awe at this unique opportunity to photograph a significant architectural space in Japan that has subsequently inspired many.”

 

 “This project has developed mainly as a personal interest,” said Capitanio. “I am fascinated by Kyu Hyuga Bettei, which does not fit in with either mainstream European Modernism or traditional Japanese architecture in a strict sense. Taut’s original drawings have never been published, so I decided to redraw them and study the plans in depth. Dave’s photos are the only professional, careful photos of the villa that I have come across. The lighting conditions, shading and subtle color and material of the project are not easy to render, but he has captured the villa’s atmosphere and beauty.”

 

 About Dave Clough

Dave Clough provided all the color photography for Homes Down East: Classic Maine Coastal Cottages, released by Tilbury House Publishers in 2014.  He is currently taking photographs for a second Tilbury House publication, a how-to book by Scott T. Hanson on rehabilitating historic homes to function in the 21st century while retaining their historic character. Clough also photographs for Mainebiz publications and serves commercial clients including architects, designers, builders, hotels, restaurants, real estate firms, and homeowners.

 

About Marco Capitanio

Marco Capitanio studied architecture at the Mendrisio Academy of Architecture (CH) and urban design at TU Berlin and at Tongji University Shanghai, where he completed his master’s degree in 2012. His professional experiences span from the architectural scale (construction drawings and detailed design in Switzerland and Japan) to the urban dimension (large developments and masterplans in China). Marco is a research assistant and PhD candidate at Keio University. His work focuses on livability of the built environment, especially at the neighborhood scale, a topic he has investigated in Europe and China.

 

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The original post and gallery from Kyu Hyuga Bettei is here.

Additional links here and here.

 

08 Oct

Homes Down East – Classic Maine Coastal Cottages and Town Houses

djclough / Architectural, News, Other / / 2 Comments

After a year and a half in the making, Homes Down East, Classic Maine Coastal Cottages and Town Houses will be released in November!  The book is written by Earle Shettleworth, Chris Glass and Scott Hanson. The book features fifty-two homes in Maine that were featured in a magazine, Scientific American Building Monthly, over a hundred years ago. Along with artwork, photographs and floor plans that were originally published starting in the late 1800’s, Homes Down East also includes my contemporary photographs of thirty-two of the homes located throughout Maine. Architects represented include John Calvin Stevens, Fred Savage, Antoine Dorticos, George Burnham and Frederick A. Tompson.

Included in this post is a sample available for downloading.  I hope you find it both fascinating and enticing. Homes Down East is available on Amazon here.

Homes Down East Sample

09 Jan

In the News: American Folk Art Museum and MOMA

djclough / Architectural, News, NYC / / 3 Comments

In April of 2013, I photographed the American Folk Art Museum just after MOMA had announced it would be demolishing the building as part of its expansion plans. After a loud collective public outcry, MOMA decided to forego its plans…That is until yesterday, January 8, when it was announced at the offices of Diller Scofidio + Renfro (DS + R) that the Folk Art Museum would be coming down after all…and soon.

The American Folk Art Museum was built in 2001 and it will be razed by June of this year…The stunningly impressive bronze facade will be gone…Take a look at the first photo and you can just make out the ghosts of the letters that once graced the building, and now even these remnants of the recent past, too, will be gone.

For more information, visit  the NY Times coverage here, Architectural Record’s story here, or Archinect’s take here. And lastly, I enjoyed reading Jerry Saltz’s view here.

 

15 Aug

Announcement: Tilbury House Book Project

djclough / Architectural, News, Other / / 0 Comments

I am pleased to announce that this spring and summer I have been on assignment traveling across Maine for Tilbury House Publishers for their upcoming 2014 book, Maine Coastal Cottages.  Stay tuned in the weeks ahead for updates from the field.  As Tilbury House explains:

Between the Civil War and World War I, each year the Maine coast attracted thousands of summer tourists to experience its natural beauty, recreational advantages, and social life. By the 1880s some of the more affluent visitors opted to build their own cottages, employing such noted architects as John Calvin Stevens of Portland, Fred Savage of Bar Harbor, and Chapman & Fraser of Boston. While many of these summer homes exemplified the popular Shingle Style, others reflected the picturesque Queen Anne and Tudor Revival tastes.

From 1885 to 1905, the Scientific American Building Monthly published pictures, floor plans, and descriptions of hundreds of stylish American homes to provide inspiration and information to architects, builders, and clients. Among these many designs are fifty in Maine, many of them Shingle Style summer cottages. Maine Coastal Cottages presents these fifty homes to a contemporary audience through reproducing the magazine’s photographic illustrations, floor plans, and descriptions, coupling them with recent photographs by David Clough. Historical and architectural commentary is provided by Maine State Historian Earle G. Shettleworth, Jr., and Architect Christopher Glass. A Spring 2014 publication date is anticipated by Tilbury House, Publishers.

For more information, please contact Tilbury House, Publishers at 800-582-1899.

<http://www.tilburyhouse.com/home.html>

26 Nov

New York City August 2012

djclough / News, NYC, NYC, Travel / / 0 Comments

The summer session in New York was a real treat. I had just added Canon’s TS-E 17mm (tilt shift) lens to my collection and it was the perfect weekend to see how it compared to my 24mm tilt shift. With that in mind, I set out to capture some otherwise uncapturable shots. Grand Central Station, Empire State Building and the Flatiron Building were all shot with this lens on a tripod. Note the floor to ceiling range on the Grand Central shot. A side trip to Brooklyn, and strolls around the city offered up new ideas, compositions and urban vistas to behold.